[Review] Glen Scotia 8 Year Old (1980s-1990s Bottling)

So it’s coming closer and closer to a year since I’ve been to Campbeltown. And while most would crave to venture back to Springbank and Glengyle and Cadenhead’s, I really yearn to go back to Glen Scotia again because for what it is it was a great distillery experience with some very underrated whisky, especially the unpeated stuff.

So with that being said, it’s time to go back again to a time when Glen Scotia wasn’t looked at as fondly by the average whisky drinker.

This is an 8 year old Glen Scotia that was supposedly an export bottling to North America that came equipped with a screw-cap top, not something you usually see with old whisky bottlings! I was told that this was a 1990s release of this age stated bottling of Glen Scotia, although this same bottle style is shown on whiskybase to have been a bottling released in the 1980s so who knows?

Either way, this is super old Glen Scotia distillate from back when they mostly threw their stocks into blends and were passed around a thousand times by different owners. So let’s see how the past tastes compared to the present!

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Age: 8 Years

Region: Campbeltown

Cask Type(s): Not Available

ABV: 40%

No. of Bottles: Not Available

Maturation Time: Not Available

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  • Colour: Light Gold
  • Nose: Quite peppery and briny to start, then some stewed apples, grass, dried lemons, slight herbal notes, peach skins, light barley sugars and soft caramel
  • Palate: Quite light, a touch of herbs, lemongrass, sweet mangoes, peaches and cream, soft caramel, white pepper, allspice, raisin toast, apple peel and salty brine
  • Finish: Medium with wet stones, grass, dried apple and sea salt, smoked shellfish and overripe pineapple

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Its quite charismatic even at 8 years old. I also seem to get notes that would work into the kind of petrol notes I’ve found in an older Glen Scotia but this one is lighter and more subdued. Overall, its a perfectly solid dram that will likely go well with seafood but not as outstanding as other Glen Scotia bottlings I’ve enjoyed.

One to send back to the fisherman’s cabin, because paired with the soft sea air this should definitely work deliciously.

75/100

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